The ONLY Figurative Language Short Story Activities You'll Ever Need! No Hyberbole 😉

 


Danielle here from @Nouvelle_ELA talking to you about NEXT year already...I really hope I haven't lost you already! 😅

When one school year comes to a close, another one is about to open. I always like to end my school year having fully planned and prepped my first unit when I come back. That first unit is always a short story unit.

Why?

With rotating rosters and little to no existing data on my students' learning levels, I start "at the beginning." I focus on plot, characterization, symbolism, etc., and my summative assessment is a nonfiction narrative prompt, where they implement these figurative language elements in a piece of writing about their own life (bonus: I get to learn more about my new kids!). 

Also, short stories are an easy way for me to diversify whose voices are amplified in my classroom and help me set the tone for important inclusivity conversations we will have throughout the year.

This is one reason why I love our latest figurative language short story analysis bundle. Friends, it's a GOOD one.

If you...
✨ Teach figurative language elements
✨ Implement an engaging short story unit
✨ Enjoy amplifying diverse voices in your curriculum
✨ Appreciate structure, scaffolds, & optional ways to extend learning

With this unit, students will...
✅ Be introduced to the figurative language element in a bell ringer activity that includes guided practice


✅ Read the corresponding short story

✅ Collect and analyze evidence of the figurative language element

✅ Determine how the element impacts the theme using T.A.G. (title, author, genre) and/or the purpose of it

✅ Make text-to-text, -world, and -self connections through OPTIONAL short-answer questions

Want to get to the good stuff, AKA what texts and figurative language elements are used in this resource? I share a little but about each of the 8 short stories and their corresponding elements below, so you can get a better sense of what to expect in this fantastic figurative feast!

  1. THEME in Naomi Shihab Nye’s “Stay True Hotel”


Shihab Nye, a Palestinian American author, writes about Jane, a young girl who moves to Berlin with her father. This is a simple short story that really allows students to analyze how a theme develops over the course of a story. 



  1. CHARACTERIZATION in Amy Tan’s “Fish Cheeks”


Tan is a popular and talented Chinese American author who writes about the shame she experienced when her crush came over for Christmas dinner with her family. Students will analyze evidence of indirect and direct characterization and the impact it has on the theme.



WANT TO TEST THE WATERS? Snag this Fish Cheeks freebie to get a sense of how scaffolded and awesome this bundle really is!



  1. POINT OF VIEW in Dax Everitt’s “Crowd”


Everitt is a nonbinary bisexual wheelchair user who uses their experience as inspiration to write this short story about a nonbinary person commuting to work using their powered wheelchair. Students comparatively analyze the first person point of view to the people the protagonist encounter on their commute. 



  1. CONFLICT in Susan Muaddi Duraj’s “Gyroscopes”


Muaddi Darraj is a Palestinian American author who writes a short story about an Arab-American teen who unexpectedly confronts racism. Students analyze what conflict types are present in the short story and defend their position with evidence and analysis.



INTERESTED IN USING SONGS TO TEACH FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE? Check out 15 songs to analyze in ELA!



  1. SIMILE, METAPHOR, & IMAGERY in Sandra Cisneros’ “Puro Amor”


Cisneros is a renowned Mexican American author most popularly known for writing The House on Mango Street. The tumultuous, eccentric relationship between Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera (and their hoard of animals) inspired this short story. Students identify and analyze the impact of the vivid figurative language throughout to understand what it reveals about character relationships.



  1. IRONY in Ken Liu’s “The Paper Menagerie”


Liu is a Chinese American author who writes a fictional short story of a boy who is ashamed that his Chinese mother is not “American” enough. Students analyze examples of the irony of the protagonist’s shame as they learn more about his mother’s life.



LOOKING FOR MORE SHORT STORIES TO PAIR WITH FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE ELEMENTS? We've got a whole researched list ready for you!



  1. SYMBOLISM in Jason Reynolds’ “Eraser Tattoo”


Reynolds is an award-winning author who often writes and shares his (and others) experiences as Black Americans. In “Eraser Tattoo,” two teens who are dating are saying their goodbyes as one of them prepares to move to another state. Students analyze three symbols throughout the short story and support their analysis with evidence.



  1. SUSPENSE in Neil Gaiman’s “Click-Clack the Rattlebag”


Gaiman is a British-born author who writes a chilling short story about a young boy being escorted to bed by his sister’s boyfriend while being told a spooky story. Students identify how suspense is built and align it with specific characteristics of suspenseful traits.



If you’re not convinced yet, be sure to download the “Fish Cheeks” freebie to “test drive” this awesome figurative language short story analysis bundle. We don’t want to brag or anything…but we’re pretty confident they’ll love it. 😉


Happy teaching, friends! 


Danielle

5 Benefits of Sentence Combining in the ELA Classroom

5 Benefits of Sentence Combining

I love language. There are seemingly a million different ways to convey messages and write out our thoughts. Knowing the ins and outs of syntax is at the heart of learning how to become a strong writer. That is why I include sentence-combining exercises in my classroom at the start of almost every class period! I want students to actively focus on syntax and think about how they convey their messages to the world. 

Syntax is the structural framework that governs the arrangement of words and phrases within sentences. As ELA teachers, guiding our students to navigate the many intricacies of syntax and master the art of sentence combining is crucial for fostering clarity, coherence, and sophistication in their writing. 


Today, I’m going to share what syntax is and what sentence combining entails and explore five compelling benefits of incorporating sentence combining exercises into our teaching repertoire.

Understanding Syntax:

Syntax refers to the arrangement of words and phrases to create well-formed sentences. It encompasses the rules and conventions governing sentence structure, including word order, sentence length, punctuation, and grammatical relationships between words. 


By mastering syntax, students gain the ability to craft sentences that communicate their ideas effectively and convey meaning with precision and clarity. Furthermore, developing a profound understanding of syntax also helps students understand and analyze text on a higher, more rhetorical level.


To gain a better understanding of syntax, students first need to know about the parts of speech and sentence structure! And even thought these are skills and concepts that high school students should know, it is always helpful to review these concepts again.

Exploring Sentence Combining:

Sentence combining is a writing technique that involves merging two or more simple sentences into a single, more complex sentence. This process encourages students to experiment with sentence structure, vary sentence length and style, and enhance the fluency and cohesion of their writing. 



By combining sentences, students learn to manipulate syntax, employ a diverse range of sentence patterns, write with a varsity of sentence types, and convey their ideas with greater sophistication and nuance. In essence, practicing sentence combining helps students become better writers.


In my classroom, I like to use these sentence-combining bell ringers to help students actively practice their syntax and writing skills. To make the warm-up activity more fun, I like to add challenges throughout the year. I’ll ask students to rewrite the same sentence three different ways, or I’ll ask them to try to use as few words as possible without compromising any of the content. 


This sentence-combining bell ringer bundle includes enough sentence-combining activities for an entire year of instruction, and it also includes a quick mini-lesson teaching students how to combine sentences!

Five Benefits of Sentence Combining:

  1. Enhances Writing Fluency: Sentence-combining exercises encourage students to practice composing sentences fluidly and confidently. By manipulating syntax and experimenting with sentence structure, students develop fluency in expressing their ideas in writing and become more adept at crafting sentences that flow smoothly.
  2. Promotes Sentence Variety: Sentence combining promotes sentence structure diversity by introducing students to a range of sentence patterns and styles. By combining short, simple sentences into longer, more complex ones, students learn to vary sentence length, rhythm, and syntax, creating more engaging and dynamic prose.
  3. Improves Clarity and Coherence: Through sentence combining, students learn to clarify their ideas and improve the coherence of their writing. By consolidating related ideas into cohesive sentences, students eliminate redundancy and repetition, streamline their writing, and ensure that their ideas are presented logically and coherently.
  4. Strengthens Syntax Awareness: Sentence-combining exercises provide students with opportunities to develop a deeper understanding of syntax and sentence structure. By analyzing and manipulating sentences, students become more attuned to the grammatical relationships between words, the role of punctuation, and the nuances of sentence construction.
  5. Fosters Creativity and Expressiveness: Sentence combining encourages students to unleash their creativity and explore different ways of expressing themselves through language. By experimenting with syntax and sentence structure, students discover new avenues for conveying their ideas, imbuing their writing with individuality, voice, and style.

If you are interested in giving sentence combining a try, I am sharing an entire week of sentence combining bell ringers with you! To receive the bell ringers, click here and sign up!

To receive the these sentence combining bell ringers, click here and sign up!

Incorporating sentence-combining exercises into your teaching repertoire offers many benefits for students, empowering them to wield syntax with confidence and finesse in their writing endeavors.

Additional sentence combining resources:
Sentence Expanding by Room 213
Sentence Structure Types by Presto Plans

5 Ways to use learning stations for teaching writing

Teaching writing can be a frustrating experience. Students will exclaim that they don't know what to write, so there's a failure to launch. Or, they create unfocused, rambling pieces that are hard to wade through.  Often, superficial essays and narratives lack detail and sophisticated use of language. But...what if you could turn that around, so teaching students to write was rewarding? What if your students were actually engaged in the process? That can happen, especially if you try 5 ways to use learning stations for teaching writing.


Now, the strategies I'm about to share can be delivered in other ways, but stations are special in that they add an extra layer of focus and organization. By providing students with the time and space to zero in on certain skills and steps, it can prevent them from feeling overwhelmed.


Best of all they allow your students to get out of their seats and move, something they always appreciate.


1. Use learning stations to provide inspiration for your writers:


Let's begin here, since it can be so hard to get students started. I'm pretty sure that if you had a dollar for every time you heard "I don't know what to write," you'd be poolside somewhere, sipping something delicious instead of grading papers.


"I don't know what to write" can be due to a lack of attention or effort but, most often, the student is sincere and really doesn’t know how to start. They need to "see" how it's done. So, before you start a writing unit or assignment, spend some time priming the pump with some inspiration for your students.


Short mentor texts are perfect for this. Select ones that illustrate the techniques or formats that you want students to learn, and choose ones that are short enough for students to read relatively quickly. I like to aim for half a page or less - unless students will be working at only one station for most of the class (more on this below).


These inspiration stations also allow students to build the skills and confidence they need to create longer, more detailed pieces of writing.


There are many ways that you can create "inspiration stations," but these are my faves:


✅ Create multiple stations with mentor texts that illustrate the same technique or genre:

If you are introducing something specific, like narrative or persuasive writing, you can inspire your students by using a variety of short texts that illustrate a particular skill you want them to learn.


After getting a lesson on the technique, students move onto stations to get some practice with using it. For example, I have a series of mentor texts that illustrate how fiction writers use repetition and parallelism in their narratives. Each station has a different mentor text and students need to identify how the writer used these techniques. Then they use  a starter sentence to create their own piece of writing modelled after the mentor text.


Stations for teaching writing


Or, if I want my students to practice using dialogue to create character, move the plot, use sensory imagery, etc., I will find mentor texts that will inspire them to use these strategies in their own writing. I put a different example at each station for students to read and imitate.


This can be done, of course, with any technique or genre of writing. Just decide on your focus, find the mentor texts, and set up your stations. The work students do at each station can be turned in for a grade, or they can just use it as inspiration for a longer piece of writing. Regardless, they are building their writing muscle through the process of visiting each station.


✅  Create stations that focus on different techniques, skills or genres:


In this case, the students will encounter something different at each station. If you are working on narratives, for example, station one might be about showing, not telling. Station two is focused on using dialogue, station three is about word choice, station four shows students how to use imagery and figurative language, and station five is about conflict.


Or, if you are doing a full workshop approach, you may have a narrative station, a persuasive station, a poetry station, etc. This approach provides students with a greater variety of mentor texts and ideas that can inspire them to try a new technique or genre.


When you create inspiration stations using mentor texts, you can allow 10-15 minutes at each station before students rotate to the next one. If you want to give them longer pieces to read and work on, you might send them to only one or two per class.


2. Learning stations can focus students on skill building


The other beautiful thing about using learning stations to teach writing is that they allow students the freedom to work on the skills they need to improve. With a traditional full-class approach, all students are working on the same thing. Tanner and Nicki, who have mastered transitions, have to sit through the lesson and activities on transitions when what they really need to work on is using more sophisticated language. Mia, also a confident user of transitions, would prefer to work on writing more engaging introductions.


With learning stations that focus on different skills, students can go to the one that best serves them. This will not only help them build their skills, but it makes them feel like what they are doing in class is useful to them. Rather than feeling frustrated or bored because they are sitting through lessons and activities they don't need, they will come away feeling like they accomplished something worthwhile. Thus, stations can help with engagement.

5 Ways to use learning stations for teaching writing


These stations are similar to the inspiration stations, but there is more of a focus on building the skill, so the tasks that you require may take more time. Once again, if you are working on narratives, you may have a stations focused on using dialogue. Along with mentor texts, you may provide handouts that illustrate some of the rule of using dialogue. Students may do practice exercises or use what they learn in their own writing.


3. Use writing stations to focus on the steps of the writing and revision process


One of my favorite ways to use learning stations is to help students focus on the process. Prewriting stations are a wonderful way to get students to start to explore ideas, ones they can put together into a draft when they are done. For example, when my students were writing narratives, we would begin with brainstorming ideas for a story - just a rough sketch.


Then, the next day I would set up prewriting stations and they could play around with ideas for the setting, the characters, etc. It didn't matter what order they went to these stations, as it was an idea generation process only. And, the next day, when they began writing their drafts, students were ready to dive in as they had all kinds of ideas they wanted to try.


Another very effective way to use learning stations is to focus students on the process of revising their writing, something they can be reluctant to spend much time on. But once they have a first draft written, you can have them spend time at stations that guide them through the process of taking a careful second look at what is in the draft.


At these revision stations, students will be prompted to evaluate their introductions and conclusions, to play with their word choice, to check to see if they have enough detail to support their points and sentence variety to make their writing flow. You can create a station for any step of the writing process that you have been focusing on.Learning stations high school


When students rotate through these learning stations, they spend far more time on the revision process than they do when you just tell them to revise. The stations allow them to focus on one thing at a time and so they are less overwhelmed and more likely to do the task well. The end result? Much better written final copies.


4. Teach writing skills with a teacher-led feedback station


One of the fastest and most effective way to give students feedback on their writing is face-to-face and a stations format will help you do that in a focused and organized way.

5 Ways to use learning stations for teaching writing

 


When your students are busy and focused at the other stations, you can be working one-on-one with someone - or even with a small group.


The best way to do this is to give your students directions before they come to the station. They need to make sure that they are focused on one or two things only so you can quickly give them feedback in class. You could be giving everyone feedback on the same thing, or students could zero in on the areas that they are struggling with.


This can also happen at a peer feedback station.


5. Use learning stations to focus & organize a writing workshop


Writing workshop stations are the perfect way to keep students focused and on task during the workshop process. Unlike a more traditional format that has students working on the same assignment at the same pace, writing workshop gives them more freedom to pick and choose what they will work on.


While this can be wonderful for our students, it’s a little harder for the teacher to organize. That’s where learning stations come in.


You will can set each one up to focus on different stages of the writing process with  handouts and/or short mentor texts. Then, students can choose the station that works best for them. 


When you use stations for writing workshop, students who need direction can find a focus, and you will have to spend less time dealing with "I don't know what to do next." This will mean you're freer to help students with specific questions or to conference with them about their writing.


Managing & Organizing Stations

So, those are my 5 Ways to use learning stations for teaching writing. If you like the idea of using stations to teach writing, but you just aren't clear on how to organize it all or manage your class when they aren't doing the same thing, click here to grab some ideas and strategies you can try. 


Check out these ideas from my friends at the coffee shop:


Showing, not telling from Presto Plans


Symbolism stations for The Outsiders, The Daring English Teacher


Jackie, ROOM 213



 

Back to Top